Free Pattern Friday – HAAAAATS!

In need of a fancy topper for your vintage outfit? Try one of these hats! Or turbans, or pillbox wimple/snood combinations! All guaranteed to hide and distract any unsightly hair days beneath their sculptural forms.

Seriously, more people should be out there wearing ridiculous headgear. All these fascinators and sparkly huge headbands are a good start and fedoras are sort of coming back, but we need to reach shoe-on-the-head level by this spring, people.

Shoe Hat!

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  1. I always wanted to knit these turbans. But where can I find the patterns? Please let me know. Thank you

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  2. I accidentally posted the pattern pictures twice instead of the pattern. All better now!

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  3. this is awesome! question, though: on the kenora, why in the world does it increase so dramatically on the first row? or am i reading the pattern wrong?

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    1. You’re not reading it wrong, but the pattern’s crammed in strangely at the bottom- you CO 61 stitches, then do a series of YOs on the next row, and the row after that you knit 3 stitches together.

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    2. I’m wondering why Kenora doesn’t have any instructions on how to finish it? It just ends at “work even for 52 inches” and that’s it? No joining whatsoever?

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      1. I went back and checked the rest of the book and nope, not a single further instruction. I guess they assumed you’d knit this narrow shawl and know how to turban-wrap it. That’s probably the case- you’re knitting a long, bandage-like strip, then decoratively wrapping it around your head and pinning it. There’s an excellent how-to tutorial here if you’d like to give it a go anyway.

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      2. AAAHH, i have that booklet!! i want to make so many things from the books like this i have too.. then i get indecisive or overwhelmed and i end up making nothing at all, baagh! what movie/show is that photo still from? it’s divine!

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        1. The still is from Terry Gilliam’s ‘Brazil’, the only movie besides ‘Super Mario Brothers’ to boast ‘vigilante plumber’ as a major plot point.

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        2. Thankyou :) That tutorial was very helpful. I’ll probably try and sew the turban together though, since I really wanted a fixed little hat for summer :)

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        3. hiya i would love to make these lovely items but where and how do i find the patterns? look forward to hearing from you kellie

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          1. Hello Kellie,

            The patterns are ‘under the jump’, that is, I shortened the entire post and put part of it behind a clickable cut. Click either on the title of the post or the blue words at the bottom of the post to take you to the full post page. You’ll see the entirety of the pattern there.

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          2. Is it American or British terminology, cause for me is important to know how to make OLIBIA and HELMSDALE as i am not English native.

            Thank you very much for this post, i am fond of vintage designs.

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          3. I believe this is using American terminology, as a single crochet looks like an American single crochet (pulling through the loop, then doing so once more) instead of a British one (just slipping through the loop once).

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            1. if there be also possible to know more about abbreviation of the short words. Chain 3 . ch 3 i understand. S.C. – you mean single crochet (which is double British?) and D.C. – is Double crochet in American but treble in British?

              Helmsdale is just talking my breath away. I have silk thread for this, i was dreaming to make fishman turban with some beads on thread already long, so knowing how to make fishnet turban, is possible to make it with new additional details :-) just let inspiration and fantasy fly around!

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              1. Hm, well I’m not as familiar with British crochet, but it seems to be one stitch less than what the American counterpart calls for, for the most part. Unfortunately crochet’s not my area of expertise, but there are several vintage crochet guides out there that ‘translate’ to modern terms.

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