twenties

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Now I too know the heady swirl of God-like power the New York Times’ fashion section must feel when, sitting around their gold-and-mother-of-pearl-inlaid table sipping fine brandies, they pull a whim from the ether and foist it upon the world not just as reality, but necessity. Oh, how they must laugh thinking of the poor peon sent forth to photograph whatever random absurdity they declare ‘trend’, giggling as they bar them from reentry until 6-10 photos from the millions of New Yorkers out and about on a daily basis are captured reflecting their warped view.

So Say I: POM POMS ARE IN!

Celebrities are wearing them!

They’re all over the runways!

They’ve infiltrated popular culture!

They’re on Etsy!

OMG POM POMS THEY’RE EVERYWHERE WHY DON’T YOU HAVE ONE ON YOUR HEAD RIGHT NOW?!?

Lucky for poor you, I have not one but several be-pommed hats to work up quickly.


(This picture is infinitely more funny if you look at each individual girls’ expression and imagine her saying “Bitch, please.”)

Bitch, PLEASE.

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Once upon a time, young men had to earn the right to wear pants. Until they made their keep through backbreaking labor, killed a man, were able to pound 3 shots of whiskey, hauled their weight in coal by hand, or some similar marker of Manhood, boys wore gender-neutral shifts. Later, they might graduate to shorts, perhaps even knickers, but full pants were a MAN’s garment.

In tribute to this intermediary period in a young boy’s life, I present an adorable romper set, perfect for a youth’s first hunting trip or to present after he takes up smoking.

Try to ignore the male cameltoe.

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Last post I asked if anyone had any special requests. Someone named Elizabeth asked for patterns from the 1920s, and it just so happened I’d scanned in a very tattered 1920s Monarch book! Unfortunately, I can’t figure out which book it is; it’s in pretty bad shape and missing the first and last 3 pages. If anyone can help identify it, I’d appreciate the help. Given the emphasis on boyishly flat and athletic ladies, with some nods to the length and trim of the turn of the century, I’m confident in saying this pattern’s from 1925 or earlier.

727

It’s knit in an interesting one-piece style, starting from the back, growing out to include the arms, then shrinking back down as you create the neck in front. As it was meant to stretch snugly over an athletic form or full-body girdle (one that also flattened the chest down) you may want to knit it slightly looser for a more forgiving and comfortable fit.

Raccoon Coat Sold Separately.

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